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23 Nov

“You mean to tell me I can get absolutely shredded with just my own bodyweight?”

Yes. 

One unanimous misconception in the fitness world is that you need big, heavy weights in order to put on some serious muscle. And while it’s true that lifting more massive weights leads to greater overall muscle mass, calisthenics may find their place in your workout program. Calisthenics is the physical training method that utilizes one’s own bodyweight, using minimal equipment. Exercises like pull ups, dips, pushups, and air squats all fall under this.

But how exactly are pull ups and dips the keys to the ultimate body? Keep reading to find out.

Pull ups and Dips = Aesthetic Physique?

While most of us dream of recreating the likes of mass monsters a la Ronnie Coleman and Jay Cutler, our genetics simply hold us back from doing so. Genetics plays a key role in dictating how much muscle we can put on, and it’s often too strong a force to overcome. So, instead of aiming for a pipe dream of becoming massively muscular, why not go for an aesthetic physique? 

Famous bodybuilders Sergio Oliva and Frank Zane are fantastic examples of an aesthetic physique, akin to a Greek god. They have that well-defined natural physique with broad shoulders, a solid square chest, ripped arms, slim waist, and minimal body fat.

Man Doing Pull Ups Workout

The Ultimate Upper-Body Tools

It comes as no surprise that most men and some women put a large sum of their time building their upper body. Aside from the aesthetic element of it, having a strong and well-built upper body makes everyday tasks easier and even improves your performance in virtually all sports. Two exercises that are particularly effective in building your upper body strength and muscle definition are the pull up and the dip. 

Target multiple muscle groups

pull ups and dips are both fantastic exercises in their own right. They’re both compound movements, activating a multitude of muscles at the same time. And because they both utilize a person’s own bodyweight, these exercises scale in difficulty, no matter the skill level. 

pull ups work the posterior chain muscles, especially the latissimus dorsi (lats). This exercise involves hanging from a bar with a grip a little wider than shoulder-width and literally pulling yourself up to meet that bar. Along with the lats, you will be activating your biceps, core, traps, rear delts, and forearms. 

On the other hand, dips primarily work the anterior chain muscles, specifically your chest, triceps, rear delts, and the back’s rhomboid muscles.

Extremely scalable

No matter your skill level, you will be able to do some form of a pull up or a dip. The wonder of calisthenics is that you can do a variety of progressions to move up the skill ladder. Whether you’re a total newbie or an experienced calisthenic practitioner, there’s an exercise for you. Progressions are the exercises you should master before moving on to do more difficult movements. Even when you’ve “mastered” the pull up and dip, there are scaled-up and weighted variations meant to increase the difficulty of the movement. So, whatever your starting point, you are sure to see marginal to significant improvements. 

How to do a pull up

If you can’t do a proper pull up yet, don’t worry. We recommend practicing progressions before moving on to the real deal. 

Here’s the step-by-step guide in performing a pull up:

  1. Start by hanging from a bar with your grip a bit wider than shoulder-width.
  2. Pull your shoulders back and down to engage your scapula.
  3. Pull yourself up until your chin meets the bar, and your elbows are kept tucked close to your lats. 
  4. Squeeze your lats at the top of the movement.
  5. Control your descent, keeping your body tight.
  6. Repeat for desired reps.

How to do a dip

Similar to the pull up, don’t be too hard on yourself if you can’t perform a dip for the first time. Try these progressions out first, and once you master them, move on to an actual dip. 

Here’s how to do a dip with proper form:

  1. Grab the parallel bars with both hands and jump up, extending both arms fully with elbows locked. This is the starting position for every dip. 
  2. Slowly lower your body by leaning forward until your shoulders are lower than your elbows.
  3. You should keep your core tight while keeping your elbows close to your body throughout the whole movement. 
  4. Push yourself back up by straightening your arms, returning to the starting position with elbows fully locked.

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Terrence Tan Ting Author for Legal Steroids

About The Author

Terrence Tan Ting is an industrial engineer by profession but a full time writer by passion. He loves to write about a wide range of topics from many different industries thanks to his undying curiosity.

16 Nov

From its name alone, lat pulldowns are an incredibly effective exercise at targeting your back muscles, especially the latissimus dorsi or lats. Proper training and development of the lats can give you that sexy V-taper that so many bodybuilders dream of. But besides their aesthetic value, your lats perform a wide range of functions, including adducting, rotating, and extending the arms. While pulldowns have incredible value for shaping your lats, here are some alternatives you should consider in place of them. 

5 Lat Pulldown Alternatives For Your Dream Back

Before moving on to the alternative exercises, let’s talk about the mechanics behind a lat pulldown. 

This exercise is performed at a lat pulldown machine with a wide grip handle attachment. You grasp the handle with a double overhand grip and assume a seated position. The movement is initiated by depressing the shoulder blades, pulling your elbows close to the lats. Afterwhich, you slowly return to your starting position, ensuring a controlled pace throughout the entire motion. 

Man Doing Pulldown Alternatives exercise

Pullup 

The most obvious alternative for a lat pulldown is a pullup since the two movements are incredibly similar. The primary difference between them is that you pull yourself towards the bar in a pullup instead of the bar to you in a pulldown. Much like the pulldown, this exercise will work your lats, rear delts, scapula, and traps.

Despite their similarities, many athletes consider pullups as one of, if not the most challenging bodyweight exercise, regardless of skill level. But what makes pullups so great is how little equipment you will need to perform them since you’ll just be using a bar to hang from and yourself as the weight. 

Here’s the step-by-step guide in performing this movement:

  1. Start by hanging from a bar with your grip a bit wider than shoulder-width.
  2. Pull your shoulders back and down to engage your scapula.
  3. Pull yourself up until your chin meets the bar, and your elbows are kept tucked close to your lats. 
  4. Squeeze your lats at the top of the movement.
  5. Control your descent, keeping your body tight.
  6. Repeat for desired reps.

Barbell Rows

Unilateral exercises like dumbbell rows allow you to work each side individually, but barbell rows help you lift heavier. This is hugely advantageous if you’re trying to build muscle mass, as lifting heavier weights leads to greater gains. They’re also a full-body compound movement that works your upper and lower back, arms, and hips. 

  1. To start, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, ensuring that your mid-foot is under the bar. 
  2. Bend over and grab the bar with a double overhand grip.
  3. Straighten your back, and keep it parallel with the ground. With your chest broad and out, keep your hips high and unlock your knees.
  4. Pull the bar until it reaches your lower chest or upper abdomen.
  5. Squeeze your lats at the top of the movement.
  6. Repeat for desired reps.

Incline dumbbell rows

Incline dumbbell rows are quite similar to barbell rows without the majority of the difficulty and are fantastic at isolating the lats. To perform this exercise, you’ll need a pair of dumbbells and an adjustable bench.

  1. Start by setting your adjustable bench’s incline to a 45-degree angle. 
  2. Lay your chest and abs against the bench.
  3. With a dumbbell in each hand, retract your scapula.
  4. Pull the weights towards you by pulling your elbows back.
  5. Squeeze your lats at the top.
  6. Repeat.

Single Arm Bench Row

Unilateral movements like the single-arm bench row allow you to focus and isolate your efforts on fixing imbalances if there are any. 

  1. Start by grabbing a thigh-high bench and a dumbbell.
  2. Place one side’s knee and hand on the bench, so you feel stable. (If you’re rowing with your right arm, you should balance with your left knee and hand.)
  3. Place your standing foot where you feel most balanced.
  4. Bend over with your chest out so that your upper body is parallel to the ground.
  5. Pick up the dumbbell with a neutral grip (palms facing you).
  6. Pull the weight towards your lower chest, concentrating on letting your lats do the lifting instead of your arms. 
  7. Squeeze your lats at the top of the movement.
  8. Slowly lower the weights in a controlled manner.

Decline Dumbbell Pullovers

While this last exercise is typically associated with chest and triceps, it can also be great for lats when done correctly. As with the incline dumbbell row, you’ll need an adjustable bench that you can decline. 

  1. Adjust your bench so that you may lay at a decline.
  2. Place your head on the lower side while hooking your legs on the other.
  3. Grab your weights and start the motion with them above your chest, fully extending your arms. 
  4. Slowly bring the weights overhead, maintaining fully-extended arms. Your arms should align with your upper body at the end of this motion. 
  5. Bring the weights back to the starting position.

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Terrence Tan Ting Author for Legal Steroids

About The Author

Terrence Tan Ting is an industrial engineer by profession but a full time writer by passion. He loves to write about a wide range of topics from many different industries thanks to his undying curiosity.

09 Nov

2020’s been a crazy year. When it seems like we’ve turned the corner, another surprise comes at us at full speed. COVID-19’s been the craziest thing that we’ve had to experience by far, and its effects continue to ripple across our lives. One thing it heavily affected is going to the gym. What used to be a release from the stress of everyday life is now essentially a health hazard, as going out to public spots just isn’t a smart thing to do right now. But that shouldn’t stop you from getting a killer workout in. To help you figure out how you can turn your home into a makeshift gym, we’ve got 9 of the best free workout apps to make sure you stay in shape from the comfort of your home. 

5 Of Best Free Workout Apps

Whatever your fitness goals, working out should be a central part of your life. Staying in shape shouldn’t have to be a chore or a punishment for binging a little, but it should be a celebration of the amazing things we humans can do. Without further delay, let’s get to the five free workout apps you’ll want to have on your phone. 

Nike Training Club

The Nike Training Club app is probably the closest thing to a swiss army knife on this list but with much more pizzazz. The best thing about this app is how much flexibility you have in creating your workout. It lets you customize your workout based on the specific muscle group you want to target, along with the time and equipment you have available. You can choose to have a workout using pure bodyweight, some weights, or a full gym. 

This app is also great for beginners since every exercise comes with a demonstration video, showing exactly how the movement should look. If you want an even more premium experience, Nike Training Club offers a paid subscription for a program lasting about 6-8 weeks. In this program, you can focus on specific aspects you want to improve on, such as flexibility and strength.

A body builder using a workout app from home.

7 Minute Workout

Working from home, and you feel like you haven’t any time to workout? No worries, just set aside 7 minutes of your day and carry on with the rest of it. As you might have already guessed from its name, the 7 Minute Workout app contains multiple 7-minute, no equipment workouts completely free. Just choose a routine you want to do, and it will display step-by-step demonstrations, so you never miss a beat. 

Freeletics

One of the worst things about being stuck at home is working out all by yourself. Reignite that sense of community with Freeletics. Freeletics is a platform that offers a whole bunch of HIIT programs and routines, along with space for you to share your results and connect with the rest of its users. It’s yet another customizable app, as it gives you exercises and workouts based on your profile and fitness goals. With state-of-the-art AI backing up this app, it learns from your performance for a specific week and uses that for the next one. 

8fit

8fit is an overall fitness app that provides not only workouts for you but also meal plans and self-care guidance for its users. 8fit caters to both the physical and mental health of its users, ensuring a holistically healthy body. This Berlin-based app asks for where you want to be, fitness-wise, and where you are now. It then gives you a fully-customized plan to get from point A to point B with various training programs, such as endurance training, HIIT, strength training, and bodyweight exercises.

Adidas Training by Runtastic

The last, but certainly not the least is the Adidas Training app by Runtastic. This app features a “workout creator,” which caters specifically to your fitness goals. Besides that, it features workouts of various lengths and a hundred other standalone exercises. The Adidas Training app lets you precisely choose which parts of the body you want to workout most and for how long. Additionally, it comes with guided videos with trainers to help push you through the most intense workouts. You’ll also be joining a global fitness community with the Adidas Training app, where you can see how your performance fares against the rest of the world.

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Terrence Tan Ting Author for Legal Steroids

About The Author

Terrence Tan Ting is an industrial engineer by profession but a full time writer by passion. He loves to write about a wide range of topics from many different industries thanks to his undying curiosity.

19 Oct

If you don’t have a home gym or a large space to work with, kettlebells can be incredibly useful for your workouts. Kettlebell workouts typically utilize a small area, and they’re extremely flexible for both upper and lower body leg exercises.

If your goal is to enhance fat loss, gain overall strength, and increase muscle mass, you cannot skip out on leg workouts. Studies have shown that ignoring legs leads to a higher incidence of injury. Furthermore, underdeveloped leg muscles lead to poorer mobility, especially during one’s twilight years. 

For this very reason, we’ve come up with ten kettlebell leg exercises that everyone should include in their workouts. We’ve included all types of exercises to sufficiently work out all the major muscle groups in the legs, including the glutes, hams, quads, and calves. 

10 Best Kettlebell Leg Exercises

Single-Arm Deadlift

The first and one of the most fundamental exercises is the deadlift. When working out the lower body, you want to include a hinge movement to target the legs’ posterior chain of muscles. This movement is also a crucial part of more advanced ones like swings, snatches, and cleans. Deadlifts are a killer exercise in increasing strength and muscle mass.

To perform a single-arm deadlift, you have to stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, slightly pointing outwards. Your back must remain flat throughout the whole exercise, as the movement will primarily be generated by hinging at the hips, rather than the lower back. With one hand on the kettlebell’s handle, you slowly lower the weight while pushing your hips backward and then hinge at the hips. This movement activates many muscles throughout the body, so you can expect to lift heavier weights with this. Perform this exercise with 6-8 reps on each side at a medium tempo. 

Single-leg deadlift

A fantastic hamstring workout is a single-leg deadlift. This exercise will challenge your balance and core strength, so you should expect it to be a bit difficult to perform. 

As with the single-arm deadlift, you must maintain a flat back, as the lower body, not the lower back, will control the movement. Be sure to hold the kettlebell in the hand opposite to the foot you will be standing on. Slowly hinge the hips as you lower your upper body, ideally parallel to the ground. If you have tight hamstrings, you may not be able to reach this parallel position. Make sure your hips stay square and avoid rotating them. Do six slow and deliberate reps on each leg.

Kettlebell Swing

The kettlebell swing is an excellent full-body exercise that works particularly well at activating the hamstrings and the glutes. The movement may seem a bit intimidating at first, but once you master it, it’s incredibly helpful for your whole body, especially the legs. 

To perform this exercise correctly, you again must keep your back flat throughout. Your arms must also be straight at the elbow, holding the kettlebell with two hands. The momentum you need to swing the kettlebell up will not so much come from your arms but your hips. The bottom of a kettlebell swing involves the hamstrings decelerating the kettlebell before your hinge pushes the kettlebell back up. Place most of your weight on the heels rather than the toes to prevent from falling over. 

You’ll want to get the hang of the movement before you really get into it. Start by practicing 10 reps per set before scaling up to 20. Other people like to perform AMRAPs for a specific amount of time when doing kettlebell swings, so you might want to try that when you master the technique. 

Goblet Squat

One of the ultimate beginner exercises is the goblet squat. This movement activates the glutes, hams, and quads, so you know you’re getting your money’s worth from this exercise. While goblin squats are quite similar to regular squats in the muscles they activate, the position of the weight does make the movement seem a bit awkward at first.

To perform a goblet squat, you have to hold the kettlebell upside down with both hands on either side of the handle. You’ll then grip this weight in front of your chest before squatting down, making sure your thighs are at least parallel to the ground. This ensures that the movement fully activates all the glutes. As with other hamstring exercises, you should keep the weight on your heels to increase your balance. 

Remember to keep your chest up and your shoulders down and back throughout. Perform 10 reps at a moderate speed per set.

weights for kettlebell leg exercises

Kettlebell Racked Squat

The next progression of a goblet squat is the kettlebell racked squat. This movement takes the goblet squat to another level by loading one side of the body. The kettlebell racked squat activates the same muscles as the goblet squat with an added difficulty in engaging your core muscles to maintain stability.

To perform this, you rack a kettlebell by your shoulder, akin to racking a bar for a clean. Holding your other arm out for balance, you then perform a squat until your thighs are parallel to the floor. This movement is great preparation if you want to progress to more difficult thrusters, snatches, cleans, and high pulls. For each side, you’ll want to perform 10 reps on medium tempo. 

Kettlebell Bulgarian Split Squat

Another key to developing major single-leg strength is the kettlebell rear foot elevated split squat, more commonly known as the Bulgarian split squat. This movement involves holding a kettlebell in both hands, squatting down until your back leg’s knee touches the ground or the front leg is parallel with the floor. Remember to keep your chest up and shoulders down and back to avoid any injuries. This movement is excellent for improving stability and engages your core too. Perform 6 reps per leg per set. 

Kettlebell Side Lunge

The next movement will be a lateral one, and that is the kettlebell side lunge. This exercise is sure to tire out your quads and your glutes. You perform this movement by holding a kettlebell upright close to your chest and then making a wide step to the side and down. The deeper you get in your lunge, the more your quads and glutes will activate. Remember to keep your chest up and heels planted to ensure a safe and complete rep. You can perform this exercise by alternating sides, performing up to 20 reps overall. 

Kettlebell Lunge with Rotation

The next exercise is the kettlebell lunge with rotation. This movement adds a functional element to your workout with the rotation. Adding this twist to the kettlebell lunge requires more control and balance, as this adds an isometric aspect to it. This makes the movement a lot more challenging, working the quads and the glutes that much more. 

To perform it, you hold the kettlebell upright and close to your chest. Make sure to keep your chest up as you lunge forward. When you reach the bottom of the lunge, you will twist your body towards the front leg. You will want to make your movement slow and deliberate, ensuring not to rush during the rotation. Practice this movement and perform 6 reps per side on a slower tempo.

Kettlebell Step Ups

The kettlebell step up is an exceptional starting point towards building single-leg strength. This movement focuses heavily on the quads while indirectly working on the hams, glutes, calves, and core. 

To perform the movement, you will need to set up in front of an elevated surface, preferably a riser. Holding a kettlebell in each hand, step onto the riser with one leg. Drive through the front leg and extend the knee as you stand up fully. Slowly lower your rear leg back to the starting position, and perform the movement again. Perform the exercise for 6-8 reps on each side. 

Kettlebell Pistol Squat

An advanced single-leg strength exercise is the pistol squat. If you can’t perform an unweighted pistol squat, you’ll want to work on that before moving on to this more advanced technique. This movement involves squatting down on one leg while extending the other in front of you, so a lot of balance and leg strength will be involved. To practice this, you’ll want to hold on to something to keep from falling over.

To perform a kettlebell pistol squat, you first have to pick up a kettlebell, holding it upright in front of your chest. While keeping one leg completely straight, you extend it in front of you while performing a regular squat. Ensure that you’re keeping your weight in the mid-foot or on the heel. When you reach the bottom of the squat, you will pause for 2 to 3 seconds before standing straight again. Keep the entire body tight and under tension throughout the movement.

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Terrence Tan Ting Author for Legal Steroids

About The Author

Terrence Tan Ting is an industrial engineer by profession but a full time writer by passion. He loves to write about a wide range of topics from many different industries thanks to his undying curiosity.

19 Oct

Bodybuilding is one of the most excruciating sports in the world. While it is a battle of physique and aesthetics, there’s so much more going on behind the scenes that we don’t see. Athletes competing in the sport have this unparalleled dedication towards extreme nutrition and training that exceeds the mortal man’s capabilities. No, they exceed the conventional limitations of the human body. And that’s why I believe that bodybuilders are freaks of nature.

It’s not that they were just born with good genetics, but it’s in their laser focus on achieving Herculean proportions that make them so amazing. The sport isn’t easy, and that’s why all bodybuilders have my respect and admiration. But some of them particularly stand out above the rest of the pack. These guys have inspired a generation of athletes aspiring to compete in IFBB events, and even the most distinguished one of all – Mr. Olympia. In this article, we’ll be showing ten of the most famous bodybuilders and their achievements, which led them to that level of notoriety.

10 Of The Most Famous Bodybuilders

Arnold Schwarzenegger

Of course, any list of bodybuilders would not be complete without the undisputed face of bodybuilding. Arnold Schwarzenegger is the most prominent figure in all of bodybuilding. He dominated the field in the 60s and 70s before pivoting his career into acting and politics. While most people know him for his roles in The Terminator and Conan The Barbarian, the physique that landed him those roles were also good enough to win 4 Mr. Universe and 7 Mr. Olympia Titles.

Arnold paved the way for many people to come to know and love the sport that is bodybuilding. He may be the most well-known figure, but many would argue that he isn’t the greatest in the sport. Critics compare his physique to the much more toned and athletic ones starting from the 90s, and they say he could never compete against those guys. While other athletes may have more titles than him, you cannot argue about the impact that California’s former governor had on the sport.

Flex Wheeler

Perhaps one of the greatest to never win a Mr. Olympia is “The Sultan of Symmetry” himself. He still managed to rack up 17 professional titles, but the most coveted one managed to elude him throughout his run. Despite that, Flex will go down as one of the greatest to ever do it. He won the Arnold Classic a record four times before the record was later broken by somebody else on this list.

Some of the top bodybuilders recognize Wheeler’s greatness, stating he might have been the greatest of all time. This doesn’t come as a surprise as he had one of the best physiques we’ve ever seen on a stage. His perfect blend of size, muscular definition, proportion, and symmetry was unlike any other. Even without that Mr. Olympia title, Flex Wheeler would give any champion, in any era, a run for their money.

Ronnie Coleman

Ronnie Coleman came onto the bodybuilding scene with a bang and is the greatest of all time in most people’s eyes. Back in the 1998 Mr. Olympia competition, the favorites to win the champion were Flex Wheeler, Nasser El Sonbaty, Kevin Levrone, and Shawn Ray. Fresh off of his Night of Champions victory, Coleman showed that he belonged among the best by winning that title by a few points ahead of Wheeler.

This victory marked the start of a dominant run, as he went on to tie Lee Haney’s record-setting 8 Mr. Olympia victories. Coleman was unique in that he set a new standard in bodybuilding, tipping the scales at a whopping 300 pounds. His size and muscular definition were legendary, and Coleman himself would say his back could compete with anyone’s. You can tell he certainly left his mark on the sport, winning an astounding 26 titles before retiring.

Famous Bodybuilder Man Flexing his back muscle

Lee Haney

How could we not include Lee Haney on this list? The guy was a rockstar, setting a new record of 8 Mr. Olympia titles before retiring at the top of the game. Haney is the one competitor to win Mr. Olympia without ever relinquishing his title. While some say that he retired right on time, knowing he was about to lose to Dorian Yates, you cannot doubt his greatness.

Bowing out of the game at 31, Lee Haney boasts an impressive 13 IFBB titles to his name. His size was one of the most remarkable parts of his repertoire, coupled alongside his razor-sharp definition. He could effortlessly dwarf his competitors with his muscularity and mass. Despite his impressive achievements, Lee Haney often gets overlooked when it comes to the GOAT (greatest of all time) conversation. But in our eyes, he could kick it with the best.

Jay Cutler

At the top of his game, Jay Cutler was a real mass monster, weighing in at 275 pounds. It’s insane to think that if not for Ronnie Coleman, Cutler might have won the most Mr. Olympia titles in history. But their battles always riled the crowds and gave us one of the most intense competitive rivalries in the sport’s history. 

Jay Cutler is known to have one of the most massive bodies while remaining aesthetically appealing by most people’s standards. Besides winning 4 Mr. Olympia titles, he also boasts 3 Arnold Classic victories. An even crazier feat is how he finished top 2 in Mr. Olympia for ten consecutive years, a feat we may not see repeated (unless Phil Heath continues his legendary run). 

Dorian Yates

“The Shadow” Dorian Yates was a 6-time Mr. Olympia, among his 15 IFBB competition wins. While that number seems relatively low compared to the others on this list, it should be worth noting that he only competed 17 times! This means he didn’t win in only two competitions, never placing below 2nd in either. Dorian Yates stood out for his work ethic and high-intensity training, which he sustained every single day of the year. He retired as one of the first real “mass monsters” of his time. 

Dexter Jackson

If we’re talking about longevity, look no further than “The Blade” Dexter Jackson. At 50 years old, the blade is still competing and dominating the bodybuilding scene. In the 2020 Arnold Classic, he took home 2nd, finishing behind William Bonac. Dexter stands out for having one of the best, if not the best, set of abs for any bodybuilder. He earned his nickname of “The Blade” for his razor-sharp conditioning and consistent contest-ready shape. 

He boasts an amazing 29 IFBB pro title wins, taking home 1 Mr. Olympia title, and a record 5 Arnold Classic titles. DJ announced that after competing in the 2020 Mr. Olympia, he plans on retiring. He leaves behind an excellent track record of longevity, not to mention his physique of beautiful lines and premier muscular definition. 

Phil Heath

“The Gift” Phil Heath will go down as one of the greatest to ever do it when it’s all said and done. But he isn’t done; Phil still has a lot left in the tank as he looks to compete in this year’s Mr. Olympia in Las Vegas. Already with seven Sandows under his belt, Phil Heath still has the opportunity to cement his name even further in bodybuilding history.

The gift can still catch legends, Lee Haney and Ronnie Coleman, still searching for that elusive record-tying eighth title. He had a shot at achieving that feat in 2018 but came up short, finishing second to Shawn Rhoden in the event. Despite that, he looks to be in fantastic shape to make a run at it later this year. At Mr. Olympia, Phil Heath has never finished outside of the top 5, and we can’t wait to see him compete at this year’s event. 

Kevin Levrone

Levrone also won numerous titles during his pro career. He wrapped up his career with 23 IFBB pro titles. Levrone may not have taken home the Sandow, but he did finish runner-up in Mr. Olympia 4 times. He took home back-to-back Arnold Classic titles in ’94 and ’95, which highlighted his esteemed career. While he doesn’t boast a Mr. Olympia win, he still remains one of the most well-known bodybuilders for his fantastic physique, boasting terrific triceps, delts, side chest, and traps. He left the game as one of the most muscular guys to ever do it. 

Frank Zane

Rounding out this list is “The Chemist,” Frank Zane. Zane’s legacy in bodybuilding history is cemented because of his stunning physique due to his meticulous focus on symmetry and proportion. The chemist belongs to a select group of three people (Oliva and Yorton being the other two) to have beaten Arnold at Mr. Olympia. He won three Mr. Olympia titles of his own before retiring. 

Frank Zane will go down in history for winning Mr. Olympia with one of the most slender waistlines (only behind Sergio Oliva). With broad shoulders, his body featured a very distinct V-taper, akin to an inverted Dorito chip. His aesthetically-appealing physique is a thing of dreams for aspiring athletes today.

Your Supplier For 100% Legal Steroids Products

SDI Labs supplies some of the most ambitious and impressive body builders in the world with 100% legal steroids. Get to know our legendary brands with guaranteed low prices by visiting our shop. Buy legal steroids on our website and make sure to read our complete guide to Anabolic Steroids!
Terrence Tan Ting Author for Legal Steroids

About The Author

Terrence Tan Ting is an industrial engineer by profession but a full time writer by passion. He loves to write about a wide range of topics from many different industries thanks to his undying curiosity.